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Posts Tagged ‘Stigma’

Dementia Friendly Initiatives and Support for African Americans

Tune in Tuesday June 4th , 2019 at 2pm EST, 1pm CST, 12pm MST, 11am PST, 7pm London & in Australia on June 5th at 6am

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Lori La Bey talks with Dr. Fayron Epps who has over 18 years of nursing experience. She currently serves as an Assistant Professor at Georgia State University Byrdine F. Lewis College of Nursing and Health Professions and as an affiliate faculty with the Gerontology Institute and Partnership for Urban Health Research.  Also joining them is Retired Army Colonel, Camilla White who has been the primary caregiver for her mother since 2014. Ms. White is also an active Community Educator for the Alzheimer’s Association, Georgia Chapter. 

They will discuss 1) the importance of church and faith and how congregations can support those living or dealing with dementia, 2) the concept of a dementia friendly faith village, 3) Challenges of being a primary care partner,  4) Ideas for selfcare 5) Removing stigma and engaging those with dementia.

Contact Information

Dr. Epps direct # 404-413-1204 to learn more about faith-based research initiatives

Faith Village Connections # 404-549-4504

FaceBook Page – Faith Village Connections

Diana Pierce and Lori La Bey

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Schedule Your Next Event with Lori La Bey https://www.alzheimersspeaks.com/contact-us

See what LeadingAge has to say about Lori La Bey

 “Feedback from the conference planning committee and our leadership team was extremely positive. Many attendees commented that she was one of the best speakers they had heard.” 

Pat Sylvia, Director of Education & Member Development LeadingAge WA

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Dementia: Stigma, Education & Adapting to Life on Dementia Chats

Dementia Chats 

Where voices of those diagnosed are heard.

Dementia Chats™ was created with the intention to educate people living with dementia; their care partners both family and friends as well as professionals and advocates.  Our Experts are those diagnosed with dementia.

Today’s video covers the stigma attached to all types of dementia, the need for education and how people diagnosed and caring for someone with dementia adapt to their new normal.  I know you will find their insights powerful. 

You will hear from the following Experts Living with Dementia:

Harry Urban

Paulan Gordon

Laurie Scherrer

Bob Savage

Michael Ellenbogen

Mary Radnofsky

Facilitated by:

Lori La Bey, Founder of Alzheimer’s Speaks

Please feel free to share this video with others. 

That is why we make them!

The Dementia Chats Series started in July of 2012,  – Watch other videos at:

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Re-Imagine Life with Dementia

Re-Imagine Life with Dementia

on Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio

041817 ASR graphic 1pm DAA Karen Love Robert Bowles

Karen Love is the Executive Director of the Dementia Action Alliance, a non-profit, charitable organization working to make dementia symptoms better understood and accommodated as a disability, improving support for individuals and families living with dementia, eradicating stigma and ensuring full inclusion in all matters concerning living with dementia.                               

Robert Bowles is a retired pharmacist and past President of the Georgia Pharmacy Association. In 2012, at the age of 64, he was diagnosed with Dementia with Lewy bodies. Both of Robert’s parents had dementia.

Contact Information for Dementia Action Alliance (DAA):

www.daanow.org,               info@daanow.org

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Denial or Lack of Understanding?

Denial or Lack of Understanding?

By: Michelle Remold

My topic for this week has been on my mind recently. During the last couple of weeks I have had some very similar discussions around Alzheimer’s/dementia.

The discussions have typically started out with the stigmas associated with the terms ‘Alzheimer’s’ and ‘dementia.’ These discussions aren’t surprising to me, but they seem to be taking a different twist lately. When the discussions start, I am able to sympathize with the isolation that not only the person with Alzheimer’s/dementia faces, but the isolation that families feel as well. I have written before about how people seemed to stop visiting my grandpa because they said it was too hard to see him that way, not realizing that it wasn’t exactly fun for family to watch the steady decline either. I think in one way or another, this is something families dealing with these diseases can relate to.

As of late however, the discussions seem to end on a different note. Whomever I am talking to will mention that they don’t like to use the words Alzheimer’s or dementia because of the stigma attached with both. They always mention that they know the diagnosis and that the person with the disease knows the diagnosis, but when it comes to talking with other people it seems to be easier to avoid using the terms ‘Alzheimer’s’ or ‘dementia’ because it seems to reduce the awkwardness and the stigma. However, they all seem to get one common response to this approach and that is people tell them by not calling it what it is, they are in denial.
I am not sure I would exactly call it denial. When first diagnosed, it might be a coping mechanism, but as the disease progresses, being able to deny the decline and the progression of the disease becomes more and more difficult. I simply think it is a way to curb some of the stigmas that come along with Alzheimer’s and dementia. The people often say that even calling it memory loss, seems to be a little less frightening to anyone they are talking to.

I think that this will change with time and awareness of Alzheimer’s and dementia. It will take time for people who haven’t had firsthand experiences with the diseases to know that the family still needs support and friendship, as does the person with the disease. Backing away from it and making them more isolated doesn’t help, it only makes dealing with the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or dementia even harder.

???????????????????????????????Michelle graduated from the University of Northern Iowa with her Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology: Social Sciences and a minor in Family Studies. She is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Aging Studies and Nursing Home Administration from Minnesota State University Mankato.

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