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Posts Tagged ‘Rush University Medical Center’

Personalized Puzzles, Reminiscing Activities Plus Clinical Trials For Dementia

Personalized Puzzles, Reminiscing Activities

Plus Clinical Trials For Dementia

Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio has been raising awareness and providing resources for those dealing with dementia since 2011.  All voices are welcome on the show.  Do you have a story to tell?  A product that will make living with dementia easier?  Are you doing research to create a cure? We want to hear from you.

072115 ASR Pieces of the past puzzle and Alz Team Dr

Pieces of the past protrait puzzles missiy and MelindaToday we will talk with two sisters Mindy and Missy Dalgarn who created Pieces of the Past in collaboration with Portrait Puzzles in May of 2014.  It is their intent to spread the word about the power of puzzles as a reminiscence activity for those with dementia.  You’ll hear from a few others and what think they about Pieces of the Past as well.

 

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The second half, we will have Dr Neelum Aggarwal from Rush University Medical Center, who will be discussing dementia and clinical trials.

 

 

 

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For Information on Dementia and Caregiving

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 Can Going Hungry As a Child

Slow Down Cognitive Decline

in Later Years?

MINNEAPOLIS – People who sometimes went hungry as children had slower cognitive decline once they were elderly than people who always had enough food to eat, according to a new study published in the December 11, 2012, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

“These results were unexpected because other studies have shown that people who experience adversity as children are more likely to have problems such as heart disease, mental illness and even lower cognitive functioning than people whose childhoods are free of adversity,” said study author Lisa L. Barnes, PhD, of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

The study involved 6,158 people with an average age of 75 who were living in Chicago. Participants, 62 percent of whom were African American, were asked about their health as children, their family’s financial situation, and their home learning environment, based on how often others read or told them stories or played games with them. Then every three years for up to 16 years, participants took cognitive tests to measure any changes.

For the African American participants, the 5.8 percent who reported that they went without enough food to eat sometimes, often or always were more likely to have a slower rate of cognitive decline, or decline that was reduced by about one-third, than those who rarely or never went without enough food to eat. The 8.4 percent of African American participants who reported that they were much thinner at age 12 than other kids their age also were more likely to have a slower rate of cognitive decline, also by one-third, than those who said they were about the same size or heavier than other kids their age. For Caucasians, there was no relationship between any of the childhood adversity factors and cognitive decline.

Barnes said researchers aren’t sure why childhood hunger could have a possible protective effect on cognitive decline. One potential explanation for the finding could be found in research that has shown that calorie restriction can delay the onset of age-related changes in the body and increase the life span. Another explanation could be a selective survival effect. The older people in the study who experienced childhood adversity may be the hardiest and most resilient of their era; those with the most extreme adversity may have died before they reached old age.

Barnes noted that the results stayed the same after researchers adjusted for factors such as amount of education and health problems. The results also did not change after researchers repeated the analysis after excluding people with the lowest cognitive function at the beginning of the study to help rule out the possibility that people with mild, undiagnosed Alzheimer’s disease were included in the study.

Because relatively few Caucasians in the study reported childhood adversity, the study may not have been able to detect an effect of adversity on cognitive decline in Caucasians, Barnes said.

The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

To learn more about aging and the brain, visit http://www.aan.com/patients.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 25,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, brain injury, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy.

For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and YouTube.

So What do you think of this article?  I’d love to hear back from you.

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Press Central and the + sign to enlarge

For more information please contact:

Katie Klink, MSN, RN, CNL

Doctoral Student in Nursing

Rush University Medical Center

College of Nursing

414-559-2101

klink8630@gmail.com

 

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