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Posts Tagged ‘rehabilitation’

Gail Sonnesso on Delivering Meaningful Activities for Those with Dementia

Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio

with Gail Sonnesso and Becky Watson

Dementia & Meaningful Activities

Thursday, August 31st Radio Host Lori La Bey is lucky to have Gail Sonnesso the founder and Executive Director of GEM Adult Day Services, Inc. with us.  Gail will share with us the blend of her studies in dementia, Rehab, Occupational Therapy and life experiences in therapeutic recreation to design meaningful days for people living with dementia while at the same time supporting their care partners.

In addition, we will have Becky Watson, a Board Certified Music Therapist and the Founder and Owner, Music for Wellness.  Becky has always been passionate about supporting the health and wellness through music and Gail and Becky having been doing some work together to ensure this happens.

Today we will have a fascinating conversation about the gift of compassion, engagement and music with these two extraordinary women.

Contact Info Gail E. Sonnesso,

Phone: 252-480-3354          Email:  gsonnesso@gmail.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TheGemCenter

Contact: Becky Watson, MBA, Owner, Music for Wellness, LLC

(757) 563-3488
Email:  Becky@music4wellness.net

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/MusicForWellness

Twitter: Music4SWell

Dementia Cruise of Compassion & Camaraderie

We are honored by your response to our offering of the Dementia Friendly Symposium and Cruise and we are encouraging people to book their cabins before we are sold out!

For more details on the symposium and cruise go to https://alzheimersspeaks.com/cruise-with-us

Click here for the Symposium Program

Kathy Shoaf the travel agent handling the symposium and cruise can be reached at: 219-608-2002 or email her at Kathy.Shoaf@CruisePlanners.com

 

Click Below to Download the Tips

I Love This Company!

Arthur’s Residential Care has sponsored and supported the Memory Cafe Concept from the beginning I brought it to the United States.  The minute I suggested they become involved in launching one they jumped with both feet in the water and have never looked back. ACR not only graciously gave us space for meetings, but provided treats and additional facilitators as our one group expanded to three.  They have been so progressive in staff dementia training and creating moments of joy for both their residents and their families; which I must admit brings a smile to my face and a warmth to my heat every time.  I am so blessed to witness their work.  Kudos Arthur’s Residential Care!

Lori La Bey, founder of Alzheimer’s Speaks

 

Insights from Arthur’s – Here is One of Many Free Tips

Help Define What “Quality” Means to You

Open To All In The U.S.

University of Minnesota PhD candidate Heather Davila describes a survey to get input from people age 55+ family members, and professionals who work in the field of aging services about which aspects of “quality” in aging services matter most.

To take the survey go here: www.tinyurl.com/Qagesurvey

Contact: Heather Davila,

Email:  wood0132@umn.edu

Find a Memory Cafe & Get Resources

Read More to Get Resources

Push Research Forward. Join the A-List

An Important message from our friend Meryl Comer:

Only twice in my twenty plus years as an Alzheimer’s caregiver has a doctor ever asked whether I was doing okay. Yet my husband would have never made the clinic appointment on time if I had not gotten up extra early to bathe, dress, feed, manage his resistance and drive him there. Now here’s a chance to be heard!

Researchers from the Mayo Clinic want to learn what matters most to you when you go to the doctor with your loved one. They need volunteers for an online focus group who are current or former caregivers for a loved one with dementia.

Click here to learn more about this important Mayo Clinic caregiver study asking what matters to you when you go to the doctor with a loved one.

Study participants will be asked to join an online focus group and answer several questions over a week and a half posted by the moderator. Participants can choose to remain anonymous. Their goal is to help healthcare providers better support and communicate with caregivers by learning:

  • How health care providers can best help caregivers provide optimal care to loved ones while maintaining their own health.
  • How involved caregivers want to be their loved ones’ healthcare.
  • What the ideal “care team” looks like.

Please click here for more information about this important Mayo Clinic caregiver study.

Your opinions are critical to improving the experience for all caregivers when they accompany loved ones to doctor’s appointments. Let’s not miss this opportunity to make doctors tune into what matters to us.

Meryl Comer, A-List Team Member & 20-year Alzheimer’s care partner

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Making Travel Dreams Come True When Disease Hits

Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio

Making Travel Dreams Come True When Dementia Hits

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Thursday, January 5th, 2017

2pm EST, 1pm CST, 12pm MST, 11am PST 7pm London

Today we are lucky to have Kathy Shoaf, a Travel Expert with 20+years of clinical and management experience in Geriatric, Rehabilitation and senior housing as an RN and ATP. She realized after years of counseling with families of our aging seniors that the QUEST to enjoy life “Should Never Have to Stop”. Her ability to overcome Fear and Anxiety about travel… Makes “Bucket-List Dreams come true!

Contact Information

Website:   EliteCruisesAndVacationsTravel.comEliteCruisesAndVacationsTravel.com

E-mail address:   Kathy.shoaf@cruiseplanners.com

Phone: 219-608-2002

Additional Resources

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Why Exercise is The Key to Improving Motor Skills in People with Dementia

Exercise is The Key to Improving Motor Skills in People with Dementia

Dementia isn’t just a disease that affects the mind. As it slowly steals away cherished memories, dementia can also cause an increasing loss of basic physical skills, such as getting up from a chair to stretch or even going for a walk.
But there is hope from a 2013 study conducted by the University of Arizona in Tucson.(1)

This study found that in dementia patients, increasing the intensity of the exercises used in a physical therapy program improved balance, leg strength and the ability to change positions. These physical improvements can help reduce falls, preserve independence and improve the overall quality of life for the patient with dementia, as well as their families and caregivers.

Other studies have shown that patients with dementia don’t do well in rehabilitation programs. But this could possibly be due to the fact that the rehabilitation program itself did not take into account certain limitations dementia patients have such as memory loss, difficulty speaking, difficulty understanding speech or simply a lack of motivation.
Based on the results of the University of Arizona study, a rehabilitation program for dementia patients must be specific to their needs and include the appropriate exercise intensity and for a long enough period of time.

This is crucial to remember if most elderly patients are going to be helped. In the United States, up to eighty percent of elderly patients that are part of a physical therapy program have some type of mental impairment, including dementia.
These factors are further reinforced by a 2011 study conducted in Germany. Elderly geriatric patients were divided into two groups of 74 patients each. The first group received a specially designed physical therapy program that took into account the challenges of people with dementia which included additional intensive exercises. The second group received the usual physical therapy program that the hospital provided.

The results showed that compared to patients receiving typical physical therapy, those in the specially designed program with increased exercise intensity had significant improvements in their physical abilities and on follow-up. What’s remarkable is that these improvements lasted nine months, even without continued training!
The takeaway message is this: People with dementia can benefit greatly from an intensive physical therapy program focused on maintaining strength, balance and the ability to walk. This will go far to help the dementia patient with overall health, well-being and independence.
The ARPF has been working with this group of researchers and funded a pilot study called Promoting Virtual Balance Exercise to Prevent Falls and Improve Cognition in Older Adults, which is in its final stages. The results are expected in the Fall of 2014. For more details about our Alzheimer’s prevention research studies, click here.

 

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Dharma Singh Khalsa, M.D.
President and Medical Director
Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation

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