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Posts Tagged ‘Compassion’

Dealing Shadowing: When a Person with Dementia Follows You Everywhere!

Click Below To Watch Dementia Quick Tip #10

We would love to here your thoughts and comments on this tip.

Lori La Bey Can Help Your Organization Switch To Virtual Presentations For Staff Trainings, Family Support, Perspective Clients and Support Gatherings.

Dementia Chats – Those Living with Dementia Talk Openly

Do You Like to Sing, Humm or Dance?

The Next Sing-Along, Sing-Alone is May 28th, 2020 -2pm EST, 1pm CST, 12pm MST, 11am PST & 7pm London, 8pm South Africa and on the 6th at 5am in Australia AET

Instructions to Join May 28th Zoom Sing-a-Long Are Below:

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89295095391?pwd=WW40T0JhZy91YlhRUGFoZ1o4NUNXQT09

Meeting ID: 892 9509 5391
Password: 489425

Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio shifting dementia care from crisis to comfort around the world one episode at a time by raising all voices and delivering sound information, not just sound bites since 2011.

Support Alzheimer’s Speaks work by Downloading the Song “Clarion Call” by the Mark Arneson Band featuring Mia Dorr on your favorite msuic APP.

Finding Gratitude During Difficult Times

See What Others Have Say About Lori La Bey

I want to echo the thanks and appreciation of my colleagues… Your presentations were movingly authentic, fully engaging and wonderfully informative. Thank you for all that you are doing, and all that you’ve done for us!

Carla Koehl, Director of Community RelationsArtis Senior Living of Lexington

 “Feedback from the conference planning committee and our leadership team was extremely positive. Many attendees commented that she was one of the best speakers they had heard.” 

Pat Sylvia, Director of Education & Member Development LeadingAge WA

For More Testimonial

                                            Diana Pierce and Lori La Bey

Downloadable Tips Below

Find A Memory Café In Your Area

Push Dementia Forward – Participate!

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Dementia, Suicide & Right to Die

Dementia Chats – A Discussion on Suicide and Right to Die

Voices of Those Diagnosed with Dementia

Today Lori La Bey, founder of Alzheimer’s Speaks facilitates a conversation with the true experts, those living with a diagnosis of dementia. This is a fascinating conversation as people living with dementia open-up and talk on the taboo topics of suicide and the right to die.

Please feel free to share this episode. Let their voices be a conversation starter for you, your family, friends and community.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 800-273-8255

Contact Lori La Bey with any questions you have:

Website: www.AlzheimersSpeaks.com

Contact: https://www.alzheimersspeaks.com/contact-us

Dementia Chats™ was created with the intention to educate people living with dementia; their care partners both family and friends as well as professionals and advocates.  Our Experts are those diagnosed with dementia. We have been doing this series since July of 2012, but given we changed platforms in 2016, only those videos from 2016 were preserved.

Dementia Chats – Those Living with Dementia Talk Openly

All shows on Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio are accessible to listen to at anytime to once they go live – Enjoy.

All DemQTips Can Be Found On Alzheimer’s Speaks Youtube Channel

We would love to here your thoughts and comments on this tip.

Upcoming Public Event Lori La Bey Will Be At

Book Your Next Event, Staff/Management or Family Training for 2020 & 2021 with Lori La Bey today! Consulting and Mentoring also Available.

See What Others Have Say About Lori La Bey

I want to echo the thanks and appreciation of my colleagues… Your presentations were movingly authentic, fully engaging and wonderfully informative. Thank you for all that you are doing, and all that you’ve done for us!

Carla Koehl, Director of Community RelationsArtis Senior Living of Lexington

 “Feedback from the conference planning committee and our leadership team was extremely positive. Many attendees commented that she was one of the best speakers they had heard.” 

Pat Sylvia, Director of Education & Member Development LeadingAge WA

For More Testimonial

                                            Diana Pierce and Lori La Bey

This Is Great Gift Idea For A Family Dealing With Dementia

Parental Dementia – A guide through all the difficult questions. Author Keith Galas, is an Executive Director with 20 years’ experience and has helped families with all their difficult questions. Every chapter in the book covers a question he gets most from families.

Parental Dementia – A guide through all the difficult questions is available through Amazon, Walmart and Barnes and Noble, but if you go to www.parentaldementia.com  all Alzheimer’s Speaks listeners can get a discount by using the code word, Lori.

Available in eBook now as well

Downloadable Tips Below

Find A Memory Café In Your Area

Push Dementia Forward – Participate!

Click Above to Get a Discount

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Have A Little Compassion

By: Michelle Remold

Anyone who has experienced Alzheimer’s or dementia in any way knows that things don’t always go smoothly.  The individual with the disease may have behavioral issues. These can be anything from yelling to laughing at inappropriate times. When at home, these disruptions might be easier to remedy, but while in public the issue of how to deal with the behaviors comes to the forefront.

As a friend, caregiver, spouse, or family member there is the option of explaining to those around you that the person has Alzheimer’s or dementia, but that can get old pretty quickly. I don’t think anyone wants to have to explain something every time it occurs. As a society however, I think there are things we can do to help those involved feel as though an explanation is not necessary.

First, I think staring can be a problem. While out, someone yelling may disrupt what we are doing, but does staring really solve anything? Place yourself in their shoes, I’m sure having people stare or give you looks is very awkward.

I also think that having compassion can make a large difference as well. Think about what they might be feeling or dealing with and how you would want to be helped or approached. A little compassion can go a long way and I think that it can be overlooked at times.

Overall, I think tolerance and patience are important. Whether it’s a child crying, someone singing loudly, or whatever it maybe, try to be a little more tolerant; you never know what the situation maybe. I think that if someone has personally gone through similar situations it may be easier to be more patient, but I think that it is something we should strive for. After all, everyone can use a little support and it is nice knowing people are behind you.

???????????????????????????????Michelle graduated from the University of Northern Iowa with her Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology: Social Sciences and a minor in Family Studies. She is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Aging Studies and Nursing Home Administration from Minnesota State University Mankato.

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Not Just Your Run of The Mill Resolution

By: Michelle Remold

With the start of a new year just around the corner everyone is coming up with new resolutions for the year. For some, these resolutions include things such as losing weight, walking more, not eating out as much or just all around being healthier.  While these are good resolutions, why not make Alzheimer’s or dementia the focus of just one of your resolutions? There are many ways to do this.

Learn more about Alzheimer’s and dementia. Expanding one’s knowledge isn’t a bad thing. Learn more about these diseases or just even take a look at the statistics. Each person who learns about Alzheimer’s and dementia is another person who can help spread awareness and who can share information on these diseases. I like to read personal stories about people who have been affected by Alzheimer’s or dementia, it helps to give me a feel for how each diagnosis is truly different.

Volunteer with people who have Alzheimer’s or dementia. Skilled nursing facilities love volunteers. You can volunteer to do a variety of things. Help with activities on a dementia care wing, help bring residents to activities, be a companion to someone with dementia or their caregiver; there are so many possibilities, it just takes time to find them and one that would interest you and fit your skills.

Learn how to interact with those with Alzheimer’s or dementia. Much of this will come from experience, but once you learn how to interact, it doesn’t go away. I think that in learning how to interact with two grandparents with Alzheimer’s and dementia, and the residents where they, lived has taught me to be a more compassionate and more patient person in general. You never know what you might learn.

Each of these ideas can be rewarding and help expand one’s knowledge of Alzheimer’s and dementia. Whatever your resolutions are for this year, I wish everyone the best of luck and a great 2014.

008Michelle graduated from the University of Northern Iowa with her Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology: Social Sciences and a minor in Family Studies. She is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Aging Studies and Nursing Home Administration from Minnesota State University Mankato.

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