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Posts Tagged ‘American Academy of Neurology’

Help Stamp Out Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Help Stamp OUT Alzheimer’s

stamp_out_alz

Lynda Everman has written to EVERY member of Congress, asking for their help in advancing the proposed legislation for the Alzheimer’s Disease Semipostal Stamp in this session of Congress. As of now we have only 45 cosponsors in the House and 7 in the Senate. If we are unable to secure more cosponsors, we will not have a fundraising stamp for Alzheimer’s research. The following is the latest response she received, underscoring the need for EACH of us to urge those who represent us in Congress to cosponsor H.R. 1508/S. 1091:

“Thank you for your email. The best way to ensure consideration of the bill by the committee of jurisdiction is to increase momentum by securing more cosponsors. I would suggest that the Alzheimer’s organization make this issue a priority and seek support of the measure from their local Congressman/woman.”

Tell Congress We Want A Fundraising Stamp

For Alzheimer’s Research!

Please call the US Capitol Switchboard @ 202-224-3121 & ask YOUR representatives to COSPONSOR H.R.1508 (House) & S.1091 (Senate): To provide for the issuance of an Alzheimer’s Disease Research Semipostal Stamp.

Like the hugely successful Breast Cancer Research Semipostal Stamp which, as of March 2014, has raised over $78.7 million for breast cancer research, these stamps would cost slightly more than regular first class postage, with the extra funds going to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to search for new treatments & a cure for Alzheimer’s & related dementias. The legislation would increase funding for Alzheimer’s research without increasing taxes, discretionary spending or the deficit.

Please call the US Capitol Switchboard TODAY @ 202-224-3121

Ask YOUR representatives to Help Stamp OUT Alzheimer’s!

For more Resources on Dementia ad Caregiving Go To Our Website Below

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 Can Going Hungry As a Child

Slow Down Cognitive Decline

in Later Years?

MINNEAPOLIS – People who sometimes went hungry as children had slower cognitive decline once they were elderly than people who always had enough food to eat, according to a new study published in the December 11, 2012, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

“These results were unexpected because other studies have shown that people who experience adversity as children are more likely to have problems such as heart disease, mental illness and even lower cognitive functioning than people whose childhoods are free of adversity,” said study author Lisa L. Barnes, PhD, of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

The study involved 6,158 people with an average age of 75 who were living in Chicago. Participants, 62 percent of whom were African American, were asked about their health as children, their family’s financial situation, and their home learning environment, based on how often others read or told them stories or played games with them. Then every three years for up to 16 years, participants took cognitive tests to measure any changes.

For the African American participants, the 5.8 percent who reported that they went without enough food to eat sometimes, often or always were more likely to have a slower rate of cognitive decline, or decline that was reduced by about one-third, than those who rarely or never went without enough food to eat. The 8.4 percent of African American participants who reported that they were much thinner at age 12 than other kids their age also were more likely to have a slower rate of cognitive decline, also by one-third, than those who said they were about the same size or heavier than other kids their age. For Caucasians, there was no relationship between any of the childhood adversity factors and cognitive decline.

Barnes said researchers aren’t sure why childhood hunger could have a possible protective effect on cognitive decline. One potential explanation for the finding could be found in research that has shown that calorie restriction can delay the onset of age-related changes in the body and increase the life span. Another explanation could be a selective survival effect. The older people in the study who experienced childhood adversity may be the hardiest and most resilient of their era; those with the most extreme adversity may have died before they reached old age.

Barnes noted that the results stayed the same after researchers adjusted for factors such as amount of education and health problems. The results also did not change after researchers repeated the analysis after excluding people with the lowest cognitive function at the beginning of the study to help rule out the possibility that people with mild, undiagnosed Alzheimer’s disease were included in the study.

Because relatively few Caucasians in the study reported childhood adversity, the study may not have been able to detect an effect of adversity on cognitive decline in Caucasians, Barnes said.

The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

To learn more about aging and the brain, visit http://www.aan.com/patients.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 25,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, brain injury, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy.

For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and YouTube.

So What do you think of this article?  I’d love to hear back from you.

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Lori La Bey Host of Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio 

has two great guests today on her show

Click on the arrow in the box to listen to the episode

The first is guest is Chirag Patel MD Chief Medical Officer of Hansa Medical Groupe will join us today to discuss his Medical Concierge Service Model…”The Horse and Buggy Service of House Calls isn’t new, it’s just not utilized much these days.”  Here how this type of service can really help those in need.  Hansa Medical Groupe is a novel concierge practice in which the physician comes to the patients/members’ home for their appointments. Service and care is provided at the members’ convenience. Your Physician at Hansa is available and ready to respond 24 hours a day. This is the first in-home concierge style medical practice in the region. Please browse our website for more information on why we believe this program provides the premier medical service in the greater Chicago area.

Contact Information:

Hansa Medical Groupe

Office/Emergency/Answering Service:847.920.0902
Email: info@hansamedicalgroupe.com

Website:   www.hansamedicalgroupe.com

Christine Phelps with the American Academy of Neurology will talk about the 2012 Neuro Film Festival:  What it is and how you can get involved and why it’s important!

(651) 695-1940

www.aan.com

www.aan.com/patients

 

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