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Posts Tagged ‘activities’

Caring Better for Loved Ones with Dementia

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Caring Better for Loved Ones with Dementia

Lori La Bey, host and founder of Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio talks with Jennifer Franza the founder of Caregiver Concierge which empowers families caring for a loved one with dementia. Some topics discussed today are self-care, transfers, activities. Listen in and you will learn a lot about how to help others.

Contact Jennifer Franza at:

Email:       Jennifer@caregiver-concierge.com

Website:   www.caregiver-concierge.com

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See what LeadingAge has to say about Lori La Bey

 “Feedback from the conference planning committee and our leadership team was extremely positive. Many attendees commented that she was one of the best speakers they had heard.” 
Pat Sylvia, Director of Education & Member Development      LeadingAge WA

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Alzheimer's Speaks Radio with Dr Jessica Zwerling.

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Helping Family Create Joy Filled Moments

Helping Family Create Joy Filled Moments

Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio

112817 ARS Graphic for Jullie Bigham 2

Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio Host, Lori La Bey, is excited to have Julie Bigham join her Tuesday Feb 6th, to  discuss how to help families engage those they love with dementia. Join the conversation by calling in or using the chat box to talk with us.

Contact Julie Bigham at Joy Filled Visits, LLC

Email:  julsbigham@yahoo.com

Website: www.joyfilledvisits.com

Phone:  704-910-9279

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3 Board Certified Music Therapists Share Their Amazing New Book

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Three Board Certified Music Therapists join us to discuss

their new book “Music, Memory and Meaning.”

Tuesday, December 19th at 2pm EST, 1pm CST,12pm MST,11am PST and 7pm London

Dementia – Music, Memory and Meaning

Our radio host, Lori La Bey of Alzheimer’s Speaks will be interviewing three board certified music therapists: Tara Jenkins, Meredith Hamons and Cathy Befi-Hensel; who are the authors of the new amazing book “Music, Memory and Meaning.”

Join the conversation by calling in (323) 870-4602, or use the chat box to talk with us.

Contact Our Guests:

You can purchase our book on Amazon. 

If you have questions, feedback, or would like to stay connected with “Music, Memory, and Meaning” and our upcoming events connect with us on Facebook. 

If you are local to the Austin, TX area and are interested in music therapy services contact us.

Phone: 512-422-9694

I can’t put into words how humbled and honored I am to be named one of fourteen people, picked by Oprah and her team as a 2018, “Health Hero.” Being mentioned twice in one year in the “O” magazine is just down right amazing.

Click here for the Article.

We are honored by your response to our offering of the Dementia Friendly Cruise.

There will be much to share in the near future!

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The SHARE Program: Support, Health, Activities, Resources and Education

 Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio

The SHARE Program:

Support, Health, Activities, Resources and Education  

Thursday we will have Carol Whitlatch, Assistant Director of Research & Education and Senior Research Scientist at the Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging with us.  For over 25 years, Dr. Whitlatch studied a variety of topics related to family caregiving including: developing and evaluating intervention programs including the SHARE program (Support, Health, Activities, Resources and Education) which she will talk to us about today.  Join the conversation!

Contact Information For Carol Whitlatch:

www.benrose.org/share

216.373.1693

share@benrose.org

Learn how you can host a screening and talk back of “His Neighbor Phil.”

 

 

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Favorite Things

Favorite Things

By: Michelle Remold

I often hear that finding activities for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia is difficult. Sometimes people have told me, they just don’t know what to do for activities with them. I always think that we all have hobbies and activities that we enjoy. I love to read and have three lists of books that I would like to complete reading. My grandpa enjoyed woodworking, painting, and gardening. As his Alzheimer’s progressed he wasn’t able to do these things any longer, but my grandma still let him have a smaller form of his garden to work on while he was still at home. Since it was something he enjoyed, it was a fitting activity for him to participate in.

I think that it is important that different facilities get to know their residents so it becomes easier to find activities that they might enjoy. While in college, a friend and I volunteered at a local nursing home in Cedar Falls, IA. We volunteered to help residents bake on Thursday afternoons. There were a few residents with dementia that would come to bake with us. Everyone loved it. They would share stories about potlucks, baking with grandkids, or learning to bake from their mothers or grandmothers.

I have heard of and have seen different dementia care wings where the wing is set up like a town and they have different rooms that reflect places that one might find within a town. There are ice cream parlors, workshops, car shops, or salons that allow people to ‘work’ on things that they might have partaken in before. While having residents play catch maybe a fun activity, I think that it is important to have them engage in meaningful activities. If someone enjoys washing tables, let them wash the tables or let them set out the silverware at meal times. Maybe have them help plant flowers for a garden or make decorations for different holidays. Whatever it is, it is important to find the skills and hobbies that people have so it is a little easier to find and create various activities for those with Alzheimer’s and dementia.

???????????????????????????????Michelle graduated from the University of Northern Iowa with her Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology: Social Sciences and a minor in Family Studies.  She is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Aging Studies and Nursing Home Administration from Minnesota State University Mankato.

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Creativity is Key

By: Michelle Remold

When someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or dementia, finding ways to interact with them can be difficult. During the early stages these interactions can be easy to create, but as the disease progresses it can be hard to either create these interactions or to find ways to make the desired connections. That is why it is important to be creative when interacting with those who have Alzheimer’s or dementia.

The ways to interact with those with Alzheimer’s or dementia can vary greatly and can provide opportunities to create memories. When I talk with family and friends about their experiences with loved ones who had either Alzheimer’s or dementia, the stories I hear often have to do with creative ideas they came up with to spend time with them.

Recently I spoke with a friend about how she and her family would come up with ideas to interact with her mother. I often am surprised at what methods they came up with. She has told me stories about making gifts with her for holidays and letting her decide who to give them to. She has also told me about creating games to play with her mother. For example, she said they would take bowls and put different objects in them and ask her what she was holding. She said that if her mother didn’t know what it was, they would let her look at it, help her figure out what it was and then she would get a small prize when she got it correct. I know my grandma used to have ‘school time’ with my grandpa. My grandma would have him work on letters, basic math, draw pictures, and write his name. It allowed her to feel like she has helping in some way.

The stories and memories I hear reiterate that interaction is incredibly important. It doesn’t matter what ideas, crafts, or games you come up with, but they all allow you to spend quality time with the person who has Alzheimer’s or dementia. Not all games or activities will work for everyone, but that is why, when interacting with those who have Alzheimer’s or dementia, creativity is key.

???????????????????????????????Michelle graduated from the University of Northern Iowa with her Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology: Social Sciences and a minor in Family Studies. She is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Aging Studies and Nursing Home Administration from Minnesota State University Mankato.

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Shadow Boxes

By: Michelle Remold

Pictures are documented moments in our lives that we want to remember. Each picture of ourselves has a story behind it; something that makes us who we are. It might be a wedding picture, a professional picture for a career, family photos, vacation memories, fun with friends – no matter what the picture, each one has a story and is something we want to remember.

As I was pursing my degree at the University of Northern Iowa, the topic of shadow boxes in skilled nursing facilities was one of the topics we talked about. There are a few ways these can be created. One is that some facilities have them on the walls as a form of wayfinding. In this case, wayfinding helps residents identify which room is theirs. Another method is to create a shadow box for each resident as they are welcomed into the facility.

Shadow boxes are a great way to allow residents to display knick-knacks, photos, and other things that mean something to them. While the shadow boxes are great for the residents, they can be beneficial to the employees of the facilities as well, especially on dementia care wings. Shadow boxes provide a way for those working with individuals with Alzheimer’s dementia to get to know the residents a little better. They give them an idea of things they like, how many kids they had, maybe a favorite color or hobby, what their career was, and more. These may seem like small things, but it can help to pick activities to have the residents partake in and discussion topics to talk with that person about.

I think that utilizing shadow boxes are an easy way to begin providing more personalized care to residents and to get to better know residents who otherwise might not be able to let workers know more about themselves. I think that Ansel Adams captures this idea, especially when I think about utilizing shadow boxes on dementia care wings, well when he said, “When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.”

008Michelle graduated from the University of Northern Iowa with her Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology: Social Sciences and a minor in Family Studies. She is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Aging Studies and Nursing Home Administration from Minnesota State University Mankato.

 

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